Categories
Living in Portugal

Douro Valley: Low-density region

Douro Valley: Low-density region

Douro Valley – mild climate, peaceful, affordable and full of good food and wine. How would you describe your ideal place to live? We are sure it would be something like this. 

Because of all these characteristics, more and more people are deciding to invest in real estate in Portugal’s low-density regions. 

As popular cities like Lisbon continue to grow, locals and expats are starting to look to these areas in Portugal for a quieter and calmer way of life.

Let's Find The perfect investment for you in Portugal

What are low-density areas, and why are they great places to live?

In general, Portugal is considered a low-density country. This means there are fewer people per square kilometer than in high-density countries. Even still, there are low-density areas in Portugal that are lower than the country’s average. 

This can be great for those who enjoy a slower pace of life and want to live in a more rural setting. It also means there are plenty of real estate opportunities. Plus, Portugal’s low-density areas also have environmental benefits. 

There is less pressure on the country’s natural resources. And its low number of motor vehicles results in lower emissions of greenhouse gases. As a result, living in Portugal, in a low-density area, can offer both quality of life and environmental advantages.

Portugal Douro valley

Douro Valley. Sent in for our Photo Contest. ©Sara Pereira

The Portugal Douro Valley is a region of low population density. It is home to some of Portugal’s most remote and rural communities. 

Known for its rugged terrain and its many rivers and streams, the region is sparsely populated, with most of the population concentrated in the big cities. 

The valley is located in the northern part of the country, and it is known for its stunning scenery and mild climate. The Douro River runs through it, and it is flanked by mountains and many vineyards.

The area is also home to a number of small towns and villages, which are filled with charming cafes and shops. Many people love living here because of the natural beauty and relaxed lifestyle. 

In recent years, the Douro Valley has become increasingly popular with tourists, who come to enjoy the food, wine, and scenery.

Things to see in the Douro Valley

There are plenty of things to see and do in the Douro Valley. Visitors can tour vineyards, enjoy wine tastings, go hiking or biking in the scenic countryside, or simply relax and take in the breathtaking views. Whatever your interests, there is sure to be something for you in this lovely corner of Portugal.

There are numerous ways to explore the region, including by boat, train, or car. Popular sights include the port city of Porto, the vineyards of Vila Nova de Gaia, Peso da Régua, and the small town of Pinhão. Visitors can also take part in a variety of activities, such as wine tastings, hiking, and cycling. Whether you’re looking for a relaxing vacation or an active adventure, the Douro Valley has something to offer everyone.

peso da régua douro valley
Peso da Régua, a city in the Douro Valley. ©Nuno Pinto
douro valley
Douro Valley vineyards. ©Rui Alves

How to start investing in property in the Douro Valley

Because it is one of the best low-density areas in Portugal, Douro Valley has seen strong economic growth in recent years. Thanks in part to an increase in tourism and in the number of expats living in Portugal. Property prices have therefore been rising steadily as a result.

If you’re looking for a place to invest in property, the Portugal Douro Valley is a great option. Here are a few tips to get you started:

Do your research

As with any investment, it’s important to do your research before buying property in the Douro Valley. Look at different areas and compare prices before making a decision.

Get help from a local agent

A local real estate agent will be familiar with the market and can help you find the right property for your needs. They can also offer guidance on the purchasing process.

Be prepared to negotiate

In a competitive market like the Douro Valley, it’s important to be prepared to negotiate on price. Have your finances in order and be ready to make an offer quickly if you find the right property.

Invest for the long term

The Douro Valley is a great place to invest in property, but it’s important to remember that it’s a long-term investment. Hold onto your property for several years to see the biggest return on your investment.

Share on
social media

Facebook
Twitter
LinkedIn

Schedule a free consultation with one of our experts now!

Categories
Living in Portugal

The Perfect Two-Week Road Trip in Portugal

The Perfect Two-Week Road Trip in Portugal

Are you dreaming up a road trip where you can drive through sunny Portugal with your windows rolled down and not a care in the world? 

We’ll do our best to make that dream a reality! Below you can find all the best places to go, things to see and food to try, so you can ensure that your two-week road trip through Portugal is unforgettable.

Let's Find The perfect investment for you in Portugal

There are so many places to see in Portugal that it’s hard to choose which cities and towns to visit. Ultimately, it all depends on your preferences – if you favor a more touristic or remote route. As luck would have it, Portugal offers many different itineraries for all desires. The route we’ve picked is a mix of both, so that every passenger can be happy. 

We recommend you start by the North of the country and make your way down. This way you can rest a few days in Alentejo and Algarve at the end of the trip.

Cities to explore in your road trip in Portugal

North

Ponte de Lima

Located in the almost absolute North of Portugal, Ponte de Lima is one of the oldest Portuguese villages. It’s amazingly full of Roman architecture and history, making it an incredible choice if you want to experience tradition. Many Portuguese traditions like the singing style desgarrada, typical craftsmanship (‘Artesanato’) and religious celebrations (‘romarias’) are common here. It’s smaller and with fewer foreigners, so English might be a little problem. However, the people of Ponte de Lima surely will do their best to help you.  

Braga

Braga is also a very traditional and ancient city, but it has acquired a youthful and diverse side in recent years. Precisely because of this, culture is actively growing. This mixture makes Braga a very exciting city to visit. On the same day you can both become mesmerised by the 18th century sanctuary Bom Jesus and catch a concert at gnration or Altice Fórum. For lunch or dinner time, make sure you try Rojões à Minhota com papas de sarrabulho and Toucinho-do-céu for dessert. 

Guimarães 

road trip portugal guimarães
Castelo de Guimarães, Portugal. Sent in for our Photo Contest. ©Marcelo Freitas

Guimarães is the city where Portugal’s first king, D. Afonso Henriques, was born, thus people often refer to it as the birthplace of Portugal itself. 

Nowadays, it has become a popular tourist destination, although still quiet and keeping a very traditional Portuguese spirit. The city’s medieval castle and ancient walls are some of its most popular attractions. But Guimarães is also home to a number of museums, art galleries and various other cultural institutions, all within walking distance. Plus, the northern cuisine is very prevalent here. 

Porto

The harbour city of Porto is Portugal’s second-largest city after Lisbon. It is located at the mouth of the Douro River, which defines the picturesque setting of Porto. The region is famous for the production of Port wine. The labyrinth of narrow streets of the Ribeira area is charismatic for the city. You can easily get lost in the countless cafes or restaurants and spend a few lovely hours that way. While you’re here, it’s imperative that you try a ‘Francesinha’ – preferably for lunch since it’s quite heavy. 

Centre

Aveiro

Aveiro is a charming city in Portugal that’s often referred to as the “Venice of Portugal.” The city is located on the Aveiro Lagoon and is known for its canals and colorful boats (moliceiros). Visitors can explore the city by taking a boat ride, visiting the Museum of Vista Alegre (the famous Portuguese Azulejos), or enjoying the views from one of the many bridges. If you’re a food enthusiast you should also definitely visit the Salinas (sites of traditional salt production) and try a fresh fish dish, followed by the typical Ovos Moles or Tripa de Aveiro for dessert.

Coimbra

Coimbra is a beautiful city known for its academic tradition, home to one of the oldest universities in the world – the University of Coimbra. Here, history, nature and city life are perfectly mixed. Right across the historic, pedestrian roads, there’s the Mondego River, guarded by huge gardens on both sides. Attractions Quinta das Lágrimas and Sereia Garden are also examples of this beautiful mix. While you’re around the area, try eating a ‘leitão assado’ in the region Bairrada, just outside Coimbra.

Covilhã

Covilhã. Sent in for our Photo Contest. ©Filipe Rodrigues

Located in the Castelo Branco district, Covilhã is a small town just nearby Serra da Estrela. It’s quite small and divided in two parts. The “upper part” is where the historic centre and the area closest to the University’s main campus are located. The “lower part” is where there are supermarkets, restaurants, and a shopping centre. The core population of the city is old people, but, much like Braga, the university brings a lot of young people and foreigners around, making it easier for you to get by. This is a great option for people looking for a more rural and local taste of Portugal.

Caldas da Rainha

Caldas da Rainha is also a more low-key city. An hour drive away from Lisbon, ‘Caldas’ is a haven for art and nature. It was even named Creative City by UNESCO. Here you’ll find paintings all over the city walls, and various sculptures through the streets. The city is also home to the University of Arts and Design, which accentuates the youthful and fun atmosphere. If nature is more of your thing, there’s many beautiful parks around, like Parque D. Carlos I. Caldas is very close to the Óbidos Lake, so you should definitely try a fish plate while here.

Lisbon

The capital of Portugal and the largest city in the country. Lisbon is a very lively metropolis – full of culture, modernity and opportunities. In recent years, it has become extremely popular, so touristic areas and attractions can be a little much if you’re more on the quiet side. However, we would still definitely recommend you visit. 

You can have a little more off-the-beaten-path experience here if you choose to explore the streets of lesser known areas. Graça, Martim Moniz and Marquês de Pombal are some examples. Although very popularized, Lisbon hasn’t lost its spirit. So there’s ways you can still have a magnificent and authentic experience there. Here the main gastronomic point is definitely the sweets. Don’t leave until you’ve tried a Pastel de Nata!

Caldas da Rainha. Sent in for our Photo Contest. ©Anabela Coito
lisbon road trip portugal
Lisbon. Sent in for our Photo Contest. ©Ana Jorge Gomes

South

Évora

The south of Portugal hides away several historic and quiet cities such as Évora. The city is known for its famous and well-preserved Roman temple, the Temple of Diana. It’s very peaceful and rather small, so we recommend you explore the city on foot. Be aware of the very high temperatures in the Summer months! And enjoy a ‘sericaia’ while you’re there.

Alqueva

As you drive through the Alentejo plains, the landscape changes as you approach Alqueva. It becomes the kind of oasis you want to go to decompress from your daily routine. The Alqueva region is around 2 hours away from both Lisbon and Faro.  Right by the Guadiana River, you can see the biggest artificial water reservoir in Western Europe, the Alqueva Dam. The beautiful lakes around the area were a product of it. This is definitely a great option to relax a bit and take in the nature and clear air. Of course, with a glass of Alentejo wine on hand. 

Monchique

Monchique is a breathtakingly beautiful town in the mountains, fondly nicknamed “the garden of the Algarve”. Here you can go on beautiful hikes with views over the mountainous landscape and Atlantic and enjoy the unique combination of the beautiful nature, the town’s famous craftsmanship and well-being facilities. Definitely the place to go if you’re looking for some peace, quiet and stunning nature. 

Tavira

Though not big, the seaside city of Tavira attracts a lot of tourists, mostly during the summer. Tavira is an authentic catalogue of history, quite rich in cultural heritage and architecture. You can see it in the old buildings, renovated but with original features preserved. If you’re looking to just relax, then you can go to one of the many beaches in the area. Oh, and seafood is a must here. 

alqueva dam road trip portugal
The Alqueva Dam in Reguengos de Monsaraz. Sent in for our Photo Contest. ©Gonçalo Pinheiro
low density area portugal golden visa
The famous Temple of Diana, in Évora.

What to remember when planning a road trip in Portugal

Portugal is a large country with a lot to see and do. Here are some tips to help you plan the perfect trip:

Decide what type of road trip in Portugal you want to take 

Are you looking for a beach vacation? A city break? Or a wine-tasting tour? Once you know what type of trip you want, you can figure out what your best road map will be and where it will start.

Choose your dates

Portugal has a Mediterranean climate, so the best time to visit depends on what part of the country you want to see. The north and interior regions are cooler and wetter, while the south is warmer and drier. Generally speaking, the shoulder seasons (April-May and September-October) offer the best weather conditions for driving.

Book your accommodation in advance

Portugal is a popular tourist destination, so it’s important to book your flights and accommodation well in advance. This will give you more choices and help you get better deals.

Get travel insurance

No matter where you’re traveling, it’s always important to have travel insurance. This will cover you in case of any medical emergencies or cancellations.

Learn some basic Português

Although English is widely spoken in Portugal, it’s always helpful to know some basic Portuguese phrases before you go. This will help you get around and be able to understand road signs a bit better.

Share on
social media

Facebook
Twitter
LinkedIn

Schedule a free consultation with one of our experts now!

Categories
Living in Portugal

The Perfect 7 Day Off-the-Beaten Path Trip to Portugal

The Perfect 7 Day Off-the-Beaten Path Trip to Portugal

There are so many things to do and beautiful places to visit in Portugal, that deciding on what to fit in seven days can be a challenge. If big touristic cities aren’t exactly your thing, you’ve come to the right place. 

Below you can find a thorough, diverse trip itinerary with seven, often overlooked and lesser known spots and towns from North to South – carefully planned in order for you to have the best and most authentic Portuguese experience possible.

Ready to go on an adventure?

Let's Find The perfect investment for you in Portugal

Starting at the top – North

Day 1: Guimarães

Guimarães is a historic city in northern Portugal, which you can easily get to from Porto Airport, if you are flying from abroad. It’s the city where Portugal’s first king, D. Afonso Henriques, was born, thus people often refer to it as the birthplace of Portugal itself. So what better spot to start your trip?

Nowadays, Guimarães has become a popular tourist destination, although still quiet and keeping a very traditional Portuguese spirit. The city’s medieval castle and ancient walls are some of its most popular attractions. But Guimarães is also home to a number of museums, art galleries and various other cultural institutions, all within walking distance. Plus, the northern cuisine is very prevalent here. We recommend you try Rojões à Minhota com papas de sarrabulho and Toucinho-do-céu for dessert. 

Day 2: Amarante

Amarante is a city of love, sweets and art by the riverside. Since it’s a little more to the centre of the country, it holds that local, authentic, northern Portuguese spirit but its recent investment in culture and general living has made it even greater a city to visit. And it’s only a 40 minute drive from Guimarães. 

If you go on a Wednesday or Saturday, you can have a very traditional start of your day by going to the local Mercado Municipal. Then, since the city is small, you can walk around to the beautiful Ponte de São Gonçalo, eat the popular phallic pastry Caralhinhos de São Gonçalo in a local café, visit the various cultural sites and churches. Then you can end your day with a whiff of nature at Parque Florestal

Day 3: Lamego

Lamego is truly a hidden pearl and one of the most beautiful places to visit in Portugal. This small town is located in the Douro Valley and is known for its history and production of various wines. The town is home to the Santuário da Nossa Senhora dos Remédios, a delightful baroque church that sits atop a hill overlooking the valley. Lamego is a particular good option for architecture and history enthusiasts, for its many old monuments and churches, but also definitely for foodies. While you’re here you should undoubtedly go to a tasca (local Portuguese restaurant) and try enchidos like presunto and chouriço for starters, accompanied by a local wine.  

The route to Lamego is extremely scenic over the Douro River, overlooking the vines. A lot of people come here from Porto via boat trip or on a Douro cruise. 

low density douro portugal
Douro Valley. Sent in for our Photo Contest. ©Sara Pereira
Amarante. Sent in for our Photo Contest. ©Henrique Carvalho

The wonders of Central Portugal

Day 4: Aveiro

Aveiro is a charming city in Portugal that’s often referred to as the “Venice of Portugal.” The city is located on the Aveiro Lagoon and is known for its canals and colorful boats (moliceiros). Visitors can explore the city by taking a boat ride, visiting the Museum of Vista Alegre (the famous Portuguese Azulejos), or enjoying the views from one of the many bridges. If you’re a food enthusiast you should also definitely visit the Salinas (sites of traditional salt production) and try a fresh fish dish, followed by the typical Ovos Moles or Tripa de Aveiro for dessert.

Day 5: Nazaré

 



Located on a cliff overlooking the Atlantic Ocean, Nazaré is a stunning town known for its huge waves and beautiful beaches. Visitors to Nazaré can enjoy plenty of activities such as swimming, sunbathing, surfing, windsurfing, and kitesurfing. There are also numerous restaurants and cafes to relax in after a long day of exploring. It is fairly touristic during the summer months, however, it’s still a quiet, peaceful area, holding a lot of its traditional Portuguese fishing village culture and ways.

Torreira, Aveiro. Sent in for our Photo Contest. ©Tatiana Ramos
alqueva dam road trip portugal
The Alqueva Dam in Reguengos de Monsaraz. Sent in for our Photo Contest. ©Gonçalo Pinheiro

Finish off your trip in the South

Day 6: Reguengos de Monsaraz

Reguengos de Monsaraz is a typical small Alentejo town located in the south-central part of Portugal. With the building of the Alqueva Dam, this whole region, which was already magnificent for its history, came even more to life. To the already existing attractions Castelo de Monsaraz; various megalithic monuments; handmade potteries of São Pedro de Corval, and regional wines, were added even more breathtaking landscapes and a big lake of pleasant temperature, allowing for a lot of water activities and pleasant swimming.

The Alentejo region is known for its slow pace of living, so while you’re here you should try to mostly relax, enjoy the nature and relish the typical cuisine. We recommend you try Carne de Porco à Alentejana and Migas à Alentejana, obviously with some local wine, like Carmim, to drink.

Day 7: Aljezur

Your Portugal trip couldn’t end without a visit to the Algarve. Although the region itself is very touristic, there are some smaller, less popular towns that have kept the local spirit. One of them is Aljezur, located in the hills of Costa Vicentina and known for its breathtaking views and sandy beaches, like Monte Clérigo and Arrifana, sought-after by many surfers all over the world. 

The town itself is very calm, endowed with beautiful architecture and some historical sites. While you’re here you should surely try a seafood dish like Arroz de Mexilhão or Feijoada de Búzios in a local restaurant by the sea. 

Aljezur puts you an hour away from the Faro Airport, perfect if you pass through some other Algarve towns on your way back. 

Now, it’s time to put your Portugal trip itinerary into action

Now that you have a list of places to fill your 7-day trip, all that’s left to do is make your dreams a reality. Soon, you’ll be exploring the country’s hidden gems as if you were a local living in Portugal yourself! For any questions on your trip, don’t hesitate to contact us.  

Share on
social media

Facebook
Twitter
LinkedIn

Schedule a free consultation with one of our experts now!

Categories
Living in Portugal

 Hidden Pearls and Best Places to Visit in Portugal

 Hidden Pearls and Best Places to Visit in Portugal

Suppose you’re planning to visit Portugal but have no idea what places to visit, worry no more. There are plenty of unique places to visit in Portugal that you will enjoy. Just ensure your Portugal vacation plan includes at least a couple of hidden pearls and other unique places in Portugal. This article will help you simplify your choice, so you can choose any of the top places to visit in Portugal while planning your trip. 

Let's Find The perfect investment for you in Portugal

Explore The Exciting Hidden Pearls In Portugal

Portugal gained recognition as one of the most attractive tourist destinations in the world, witnessing increased tourism in recent years. Portugal is home to several amazing pearls, including fairy tale castles, azure beaches, and gold-lined churches. Anyone who visits will have an amazing experience because of the fusion of history, art, culture, and delectable cuisine. 

Next, we’ll take you through some of the hidden pearls and the most beautiful places to visit in Portugal to make your stay exciting and memorable.

The Best Places To Visit In Portugal

Azores Islands

The Azores islands are a Portuguese archipelago that can be reached from Lisbon in two hours and thirty minutes by air. People typically picture the country’s major territory when they think about the best places to visit in Portugal. However, the middle of the Atlantic Ocean is home to some of the most stunning Portuguese pearls.

The nine exotic Azores islands are ideal for an eco-friendly vacation and are, without a doubt, one of the unique places to visit in Portugal. Only 5% are urbanized, and the remainder is unspoiled natural areas. The stunning volcanic crater on San Miguel Island, often known as the Sete Cidades, is one of the most well-known images. You may hike and explore the stunning lakes. The most popular is Lagoa Verde and Lagoa Azul, but Lagoa do Canario is closer for a more cozy setting. You can reach a route leading to Miradouro Boca do Inferno from there.

azores
Azores
benagil
Benagil Cave

Benagil Cave

Benagil Cave is among the top places on Portugal’s Algarve Coast. This is one of the regions in Portugal you’ll find lovely. Benagil Cave was created by the gradual accumulation of layers of limestone from the Algarve’s coastline. The Benagil Cave has a spherical dome on top and is illuminated throughout. It boasts a private, remote white sand beach. There are a few arched entrances to the cave, and the dome is considerably larger than you would anticipate.

A well-liked location is Benagil Cave, and for a good reason. You may kayak or take a boat ride to the cave off of Benagil Beach to see it. The boat excursion is something I’d suggest because you’ll get to see more of the coastline. You can stroll on top of the cave and look down into the dome in addition to entering the cave itself.

The Livraria Bertrand

The world’s oldest bookstore, Livraria Bertrand, was established in 1732 in Lisbon’s Rua Direita do Loreto and is listed in the Guinness World Book of Records. Pedro Faure, the bookshop’s founder, opened his doors as the nation gained fame among French booksellers in the eighteenth century. Over the years, notable authors would come to the store, making it a part of the city’s cultural landscape.

Even though the 1755 earthquake destroyed the Livraria Bertrand, forcing the owners to relocate, they were unfazed and, after leaving the city for a short time, returned 18 years later to Rua Garrett, where it has stood proudly since 1773. Today, it ranks as one of the unique places to visit in Portugal.

troia
Troia Peninsula

Troia Peninsula

Some of the most abundant and prominent places to visit in Portugal are the Troia Peninsula, a part of the Grandola municipality in the Setúbal District. Troia Peninsula offers more than just some of the best golf courses and eateries serving the best regional cuisine; it also lets you get up close and personal with dolphins that dwell along the coast. The aquatic tours and boats leave from the marina, providing fantastic opportunities to observe these animals in action.

Óbidos

This little, beautifully preserved medieval village of Obidos is another hidden pearl in Portugal that you should consider visiting. While it is possible to stroll and take in the view, there are a few activities you shouldn’t skip.

First, do the city wall walk for the best city views. Next, sample the native Ginja, a cherry-flavored liqueur presented in a tiny chocolate cup. Along the town’s main route, numerous businesses are offering Ginja and other items. Look about the Santa Maria Church, where King Afonso V wed his cousin Isabel in 1444 if you’re interested in history.

Óbidos

Share on
social media

Facebook
Twitter
LinkedIn

Schedule a free consultation with one of our experts now!

Categories
Living in Portugal

Nazaré

Nazaré

Half-moon shaped village by the sea

In the West region of Portugal and righ by the sea, Nazaré is a coastal paradise with a quiet essence. It’s also a world renown surf spot where some of the great waves were found, mainly Garret McNamara 100 foot wave.

Let's Find The perfect investment for you in Portugal

A traditional fishing village

Nazaré is one of the greatest and oldest fishing villages in Portugal, where colourful fishing traditions and fishmongers who still wear the traditional seven skirts, are very common.

Given the fishing traditions, brightly-coloured boats and fish stalls are seen all over the white sandy beaches, it’s safe to say that the fishing commerce is very much alive in Nazaré.

 

boat
boat
Best sea sightseeing and surf spots

Being a coastal city does enable Nazaré to be one of the best places in the Portuguese coast. Between the wide sandy beaches, the great waves and mild climate, it’s an attractive spot to vacation or retire in. 

Besides the beautiful views and beaches, Nazaré is home to at least two great spots, Sítio da Nazaré and Nazaré Canyon. 

Sítio da Nazaré, a place with one of the most famous views in the Portuguese coast, at a height of 318 metre of solid with a sheer drop to the sea. To reach the top, you can go by foot or by using the funicular.

Nazaré Canyon tends to be THE most sought after spot,  due to the giant waves that appear around the area. A rock solid canyon in the middle of the sea, it results of a submarine geomorphological phenomenon. It’s the largest underwater canyon in Europe with a maximum depth that reaches 5000m.

wave

Because of these amazing giant waves, Nazaré attract surf enthusiasts and professional surfers from all over the world. And not just surf pros but surf legends like Garret McNamara.

As a pro he has surfer some of the biggest waves in the world, won several championships and explored more beaches and seas in one lifetime, than most dream to do. One of his biggest accomplishments, was right here in Portugal’s Nazaré, with him surfing the 100 foot wave. 

This adventure has been made into a documentary / nonfiction series and nominated for two Emmy’s. And our small coastal city played it’s amazing part, so it’s more than worthy the visit or the move there.

Enjoy the picturesque mood and gorgeous sea views

If you love the sea and living by sea, this is the place to settle down in. If you don’t live by the sea, but sure wished you did, this is the spot to start. And finally, investment wise, if you really want to make some profit, Nazaré has become one of the most sought after and rentable places in Portugal.

If either of these or all, are something you wish for, get in touch with us

Share on
social media

Facebook
Twitter
LinkedIn

Schedule a free consultation with one of our experts now!

Categories
Living in Portugal

10 great places to retire in Portugal

10 great places to retire in Portugal

The choice of where to retire is not an easy one. After four of five decades of toil and saving, people naturally want the most comfortable life they can get without breaking the bank. Healthcare quality and affordability is an important factor to consider. Other factors include the climate, lifestyle, insurance, friendliness of the people, and personal security.  When considering where to retire, many people naturally consider Portugal which is ranked the fourth best place to retire in the world by the World Economic Forum.

Some of the elements that contributed to this ranking are

  • Portugal has a 96% positive rating for healthcare
  • 88% positive rating for climate
  • 87% positive rating for housing

Let's Find The perfect investment for you in Portugal

Why retire in Portugal?

It’s possible to retire in many cities of Portugal for as little as $1,400 while still maintaining an excellent quality of life. Many of the areas in the south of Portugal boast over 300 days of sunshine, and the north is known for the warmth of its people. 

Cuisine is unmatched in Portugal, as is the quality of many of its wines. The Mediterranean Diet is consistently ranked the #1 best diet for health by US News’s annual best diets rating. 

The Vision of Humanity’s 2021 Global Peace ranking found that Portugal was the 4th most peaceful country in the world. Crime is low across the country, and most crime is of a non-violent nature. 

The Portuguese government has numerous programs in place with generous benefits to attract foreign investors, professionals, and retirees to the country. 

Where to retire in Portugal

Portugal is full of potential retirement areas that span many climates and styles of life. From rural to urban, warm-all-round to skiing in the winter, Portugal really does have it all.  

With so many gorgeous areas to choose from to retire in Portugal, we have made a list of 10 of our favorite spots, each unique in its own special way. 

Arcos de Valdevez

The municipality of Arcos de Valdevez is situated just 40 minutes south of Galicia’s southern border, and 40 minutes north of Portugal’s Braga, a city considered to be the center of Portugal, which is also home to the country’s oldest cathedral.

Arcos de Valdevez furnishes modernity coupled with comfortable quietude. Nestled in the countryside, the village of 22,000 people is virtually on the border of the Peneda-Gerês National Park, which boasts rugged hills, top-class campsites, and excellent hiking trails. 

Anyone looking to retire in Portugal in a tranquil yet connected town should consider living in Arcos de Valdevez.

Amarante

The Amarante village is located near two powerhouses of Portuguese history—Porto, the progenitor of world-famous Port wine, and Guimaraes, where both Portugal itself and the nation’s first king were born. 

This quiet village is therefore ideally situated for anyone seeking the quiet of the countryside with an easy connection to major cities. 

For retirees who love golf, the village has an exquisite golf course designed by Portuguese architect Jorge Santana da Silva. The course combines the magnificence of nature in all its splendor with the raw challenge of 18 holes.

Aveiro

Aveiro is known as the Venice of Portugal because of its beautiful network of canals. But instead of gondolas, Aveiro has brightly colored moliceiros which have become the unofficial symbol of the town, much like Lisbon’s famous Tram 28. 

English is widely spoken due to the city’s dependence on tourism so Aveiro is an excellent location for anyone who speaks little Portuguese and is yet eager to retire in Portugal. 

Being a small city with a population of approximately 73,000, Aveiro is far less hectic than any metropolis, although the major city of Porto is just a 45-minute drive away. There is also a train to Porto with discounts for people who are over 65. 

Plenty of internet groups arrange meetups for expats in Aveiro, such as an easy night of drinks or a day out in the sun. 

Aldeias do Xisto

On the south and west of Coimbra—home of the country’s oldest university and its iconic style of Coimbra Fado—we come to Aldeias do Xisto, or Villages of Schist. This is a group of eight separate villages in the Serra da Lousa mountain range, in the center of the country. 

Connected trails take you to each village which sports traditional schist and wood homes, water fountains, and tiny streets. It is the ultimate idyllic setting for anyone who wants to live their golden years nestled comfortably within the tranquility of mountainous surroundings. 

The location is perfect for outdoors types who love hiking, Portuguese culture, breathtaking nature, and excellent Portuguese food.

Portimão

For those who prefer a beach-centric location, and the laid-back comfort of great weather, few places match up to Portimão’s renown. 

Although pronouncing the Algarvian town’s name can be challenging for non-Portuguese people, retiring there certainly isn’t. A couple can easily live on $2,500 a month in Portimão. And most of the popular restaurants have menus in multiple languages. English is widely spoken, as are many other European languages. 

What were once fishing docks, harking back to the town’s origins as a fish processing center, are now pedestrian walkways bordered by excellent restaurants and great shops. 

Any mention of Portimão wouldn’t be complete without talk of the Algarve’s beautiful beaches, such as the exquisite Praia da Rocha, located just 5 minutes away by car.

Sines

Sines is a small city and old fishing town of 14,000 inhabitants, bordering the Atlantic Ocean near the south of Portugal. It has become a major tourist attraction.

The ruins of a romantic medieval castle overlook the bay, and the town is surrounded by excellent beaches such as Praia Vasco da Gama, Praia de São Torpes, Praia do Morgavel, and others. 

Sines is ideal for those looking for a beach-centric location with great weather yet far from the high-season bustle of the Algarve. 

Chaves

Chaves is renowned for its thermal baths. It was a popular Roman settlement because of them. The northern city has numerous spa centers to relax your muscles and help cure many common ailments, and its many hot springs offer reprieve during the cold months, which are more numerous here than in more southern areas. 

The city offers plenty of other relaxing things to do, such as visiting the town’s main square—Praça de Camões—for a café or strolling through the Jardim Público de Chaves, the city’s public gardens. 

As with all other Portuguese towns, excellent dining is a given, as is the wide choice of fine wine.  

Serra da Estrela

Serra da Estrela—translated as Mountain of the Star—is Portugal’s highest mountain, and a popular skiing destination for locals during the winter months. The beauty of this area is nothing short of breathtaking, and Serra da Estrela is perfect for anyone wanting to live surrounded by nature. 

Other activities in the area include horse riding and, for the more adventurous, mountain biking. 

This is also the home of the world-famous Serra da Estrela cheese which tastes great with traditional bread. 

Retiring here means living near comfy log fires, snow-capped mountains in the winter, and stunning nature trails.

Terceira Island, Azores

For US retirees who want the good life offered by the Portuguese lifestyle but also wish to stay connected to the states, no place is better than Terceira Island in the Azores

A primary setting in the touching book of Portuguese culture intertwined with US culture, The Tenth Island by Pulitzer Prize-winning Diana Marcum, Terceira Island’s economy is greatly driven by the local support services and businesses that have grown around the US Airbase. 

The island is a gem in itself, with breathtaking views of the Atlantic and splendid sunsets. 

A mild climate all year round, with only moderate rainfall, Terceira Island is an excellent location for anyone chasing down “the good life.”

Sintra

Sintra - Jubilarse en Portugal - Pearls of Portugal

This fairy-tale location is home to some of the most striking forestry and nature in the entire country. It captivated the imagination of many artistic masters such as Thomas Bernhard, Hans Christian Andersen, Lord Byron, and Eça de Queirós, who all spent time there to rejuvenate and grow inspired. 

Much of the area was forested by Swiss-Bostonian-turned-countess Elise Friederike Hensler and her husband King Ferdinand II of Portugal. Their mutual passion for botany was responsible for creating the Park at the Palace of Pena into a magnificent ecosystem of natural life. 

Sintra is just a train ride away from Central Lisbon despite feeling like another world entirely. You can easily pop down to one of the beaches at Costa da Caparica for the day, or to Lisbon for some shopping, before coming back to rest in this modern-day paradise.

Want to retire in Portugal?

The easiest way to retire in Portugal is to hire a specialist who can assist you in all matters of finding a property, getting a residency permit, obtaining the proper insurance, and anything else that’s needed to get you settled in this beautiful country. 

To find out how Pearls of Portugal can help you retire in Portugal, contact us today for a no-obligation consultation

 

Share on
social media

Facebook
Twitter
LinkedIn

Schedule a free consultation with one of our experts now!

Categories
Living in Portugal

Foz da Égua

Foz da Égua

A village of movies and books

Right at the center of Portugal, near Serra do Açor and within Coimbra district, we find Foz da Égua. An incredible schist village with such unique features, that it is called Portuguese Indiana Jones village or Portuguese Shire.

Let's Find The perfect investment for you in Portugal

Indiana Jones Village

Very close to other villages such as Chãs d’Égua and Piodão, Foz de Égua is nature wonder waiting to be explored. It has extremely unique features that make it such a distinctive village.

Quite idyllic and unique, Foz de Égua is set out in terraces and crossed by a significant water source, having the two sides of the village connected by two main bridges. The double stone bridge, of which pass underneath two different stream that end up converging into one.

These streams come from another two villages in the region, Piódão and Chã d’Égua. After passing underneath their respective bridge, they converge into one stream only, which is way this bridge represents a union of sorts.

The second main bridge is the renown Indiana Jones styled wooden suspension bridge. Because of its features and adventurous look, it attracts lot of tourist and nature adventurers. 

As every Indiana move had its risks, so does this bridge given its precarious construction, so it’s not crossable due to safety reasons. But it’s still a great attraction, because of the amazing views and the great photos you can take of the village and landscape from that point.

Foz da Égua
 Portuguese version of Tolkien’s Shire

The village of Foz da Égua is completely immersed in the surrounding nature. Being organised per descending terraces until the fluvial beach, where each terrace holds a very few houses, makes Foz da Égua look like a fairy tale village.

The village is filled with small houses made of dark schist and slate, immersed in the greenery of the countryside, with trees and plants peeking around all sides of each house. This enchanted image as made Foz da Égua worthy of comparison to Tolkien‘s amazing imagined houses of the Lord of the Rings Shire’s

This happens so much, that Foz da Égua has been called the Hobbit village.

To complete the schist and slate look of the whole village, you can find a schist altar at the top of the village. Completely built with schist, the small altar represents the nativity scene at the top of the village.

Water delights

Right in the middle of one of Portugal’s protected areas, from a geological formation crossed by the Barroca de Degraínhos, result successive waterfalls. One of them is located in Serra do Açor, a beautiful 19 meters high waterfall called Fraga de Pena

Fraga da Pena is located in Mata da Margaraça, at the extreme of Serra do Açor protected land.

Delicias del Agua - Foz da Agua - Pearls of Portugal

On the other hand, within Foz da Égua village, you can count on the renown riverside village of its namesake. At same point in time, a dam was built, which resulted in the natural appearance of a gorgeous natural pool with crystal clear waters. That is today called the Foz da Égua riverside beach.

One can easily access the beach freely at the end of a series of hiking routes and nature trails. The accesses to the river beach are through steep schist steps but otherwise, the pool surrounding floor is quite flat.

Foz da Égua
Whether in summer or winter

No matter the kind of thrill you are looking for, when visiting or moving to Portugal, Foz da Égua is a mythical fairy tale village that must be included in your travel plans.

And the great thing about the unique village is that it’s equally attractive in every season of the year!

If that’s something you wish for, get in touch with us

Share on
social media

Facebook
Twitter
LinkedIn

Schedule a free consultation with one of our experts now!

Categories
Living in Portugal

Tavira

Tavira

Typical southern coastal city

Right by the sea, on the southern side of Portugal, Tavira comes up as a highly recommended place to invest in for vacations. As a southern city by the sea, its wide territory extends itself from the coast to the mountains, offering different kinds of environments.